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Archive for May, 2012

 

Getting Logs

Wednesday, May 16th, 2012

Hi, new to prepping and found your site.  Love all the good info there. Read one of the articles on getting logs and thought I would comment.  We live in the country in Louisiana and our state has huge pine forest and logging industry.  They cut tracks everywhere you look around here.  They take some time cleaning up after themselves and sometimes don’t at all. There is so much wood left over it is amazing.  You can really get as much as you want.  There are a couple of ways to accomplish this.

1. Approach the owner of the land, if clean up was not part of his deal with the paper mill he will gladly let you take what you want for free.  Often even if clean up was apart of the deal they will let you take what you want because they usually burn what is left anyway.

2. Approach the logging foreman for the track cut.  A case of beer will usually do the trick and you can have all you want.

3. Go in on the weekend and take what you want.  They are gonna burn it anyway so no one here minds, usually anyway.

There is allot of all types of wood to be found doing this, including hard woods and pecan.  All different sizes and shapes.  You can do allot with what you find.

This works well here in Louisiana and might work in other area’s too.

Your new friend,

Don Bottoms

 

Your “squatter” article

Monday, May 14th, 2012
Hello Claire,
About your “squatter” article, I wanted to thank you so much for writing it. You are very compassionate and that is refreshing to see. Also, you did not hold back on the legalities of “squatting”. That is good for all to know more about. I watched a movie last night that had me in tears. It’s called “Missing in America”. It’s been around awhile but Danny Glover was in it and some other pretty, well known actors. It was about an area(looked like around Ranier in the movie) where a few veterans were living in the woods.I couldn’t stop thinking about it this a.m. so I just googled “living in the woods” or something like that, and found your article. Anyway, all I wanted to do was let you know I read it and appreciated it so much. I am almost 60, returned to college for a 2 year degree in Medical Administrative Assistant so I can hopefully get a decent job for as long as I can keep working. I am unmarried(divorced 16 years now)no children and I stayed in a homeless shelter recently just so I could get my bearings and figure out what to do next. I don’t drink, do drugs or smoke, but yep, I was among the homeless. If I were not a woman I might try living in the woods but also, I have always tried to be law-abiding and do respect others rights and properties.

I hope all the info you provided gets around to as many as possible. Caretaking could be a good thing for both parties. It’s hard to think about the millions of homeless though and especially those that can’t bear to trust or be near people anymore. I can relate a little but I know they have been through much more than I ever will experience.

Thank you again,
Denise R., OR

 
 


 
 

 
 
 
 
 
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